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Friday, April 19, 2024

Prince Harry: This tic of language very noticed during his last interview with Meghan


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Now settled in the United States, Prince Harry has forgotten some British rudiments, starting with his vocabulary. And for good reason, from now on, he uses many American expressions.

After seven months in California, Prince Harry has forgotten his English. Now settled in the United States with his wife Meghan Markle and his son Archie, the Duke of Sussex seems to be completely integrated in his new country, which he should leave for a while for financial reasons.

But having a house in Montecito and interfering in the next American presidential election was not enough for Prince Harry to embrace the “American way of life”. And for good reason, he even adopted some purely American expressions.

In his last interview with Meghan Markle, the most seasoned observers noticed some language tics that Prince Harry opted for, such as when he launched “pop the hood”. However, while Americans use the word “hood” to refer to the hood, the British use the word “hood,” The Sun points out. Prince Harry, now a fan of Americanisms, may even lose his British accent, the same one his wife adopted after their marriage.

These British expressions borrowed by Meghan Markle

Even though she has returned to her native California, it seems that she has not lost some of her British ways, which amuses her American friends somewhat. “Meghan was the all-American girl before she met Harry, but since living in the UK she has adopted certain phrases,” said one source.

Her friends find it fun to listen to an American celebrity use Britishisms. You often hear him say ‘Oh my darling'”. However, while Meghan Markle’s accent is well integrated, Elizabeth II may not like the new way of talking about Prince Harry, as she is a fan of the “posh” accent typical of British high society.

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